bass.jpg

Overview and Instructions


Research basic facts about instruments of the orchestra.

1. Names of the families
2. Names of the instruments in each family.
3. Picture of each instrument.
4. What each instrument is made of.
5. How each is played.
6. Describe what each instrument sounds like and find an audio or video clip of each.
7. At least 2 interesting facts about each instrument.

May create a web page, wiki page, knowledge map, Ebook, Powerpoint presentation, paper notebook, or complete instrument study books.


Use these websites to research each instrument.


The Music Room
San Francisco Kids
NY Philharmonic Kids
Learn About Instruments
DSO Kids
Oregon Symphony
Play Music
BSO Kids
Simple English Wikipedia
Wikipedia
FlickrCC (free, legal pictures)


Answer the questions below for each instrument.
Highlight It


String Family


Violin


The violin is a string instrument that is played with a bow
Picture: external image Violon.pnghttp://www.neenah.k12.wi.us/cl/newsletter/S03155629.1/Becker_Violin.jpg

What is it made of?

The word “violin” is related to the word “viol”, but the violin did not develop directly from the instruments called viols. It was more like the medieval rebec which was an instrument held under the chin and bowed. In the 16th century there was an instrument called the lira da braccio,[1] which was an early form of the violin.
In the 17th century there were several families of luthiers who were extremely good at making instruments. The most famous violin makers were Stradivarius, Amati and Guarneri. Some of the instruments that these luthiers made are still in existence today. They are some of the best instruments in existence, and can fetch prices of several million dollars.

How is it played?

As with most instruments, it takes years of practice to become a really good violinist. Beginners start by practicing on the “open strings” (without using the left-hand fingers). At first the beginner can pluck the strings, then he or she can learn how to use the bow. Gradually the player can learn how to stop the strings with the fingers to get all the different notes. At first the learner will play in “first position”. This means that finger 1 (the fingers are numbered from 1 to 4, the thumb being behind the neck of the instrument) is playing a note which is a whole tone above the open string. For example, on the D string it is playing a stopped E. When he or she is more advanced the player will play in other positions by moving the left hand up the fingerboard nearer to the bridge. There is also a half position in which the first finger is stretched back.
The violinist has to learn to put the fingers in exactly the right place so that the music is “in tune” (this is called intonation). He will also learn vibrato.
Besides plucking (pizzicato) there are many special effects such as glissando, portamento and harmonics as well as double stopping, chords or using scordatura tuning.
The violin can be played either standing or sitting down. When playing solo music the violinist normally stands, but when playing in chamber music or in orchestras he sits (although this was not always the case). When sitting he may have to turn his right leg in so that it does not get in the way of the bow.


At least 2 interesting facts.
n the Classical music period the great composers Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven all wrote solo works for the violin as well as a vast amount of chamber music, especially string quartets.
In the Romantic period many virtuoso violin works were written. These include concertos by Mendelssohn, Saint-Saëns, Brahms, Bruch, Wieniawski, Tchaikovsky, Dvořák, and in the 20th century Elgar, Sibelius, Szymanowski, Bartók, Stravinsky, Berg, Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Hindemith and Penderecki. In the 19th century Niccolò Paganini was undoubtedly the most famous violinist. He composed and played violin music that was harder than anyone had played before. People compared him to the devil because he could play so brilliantly (and because of his looks).


Describe its sound. a nice n loud sound

Web address where it can be heard.
http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=3


Viola


A viola (pronounced vee-Oh-la) is a musical instrument which is similar to the violin and cello.
Picture: external image Bratsche.jpghttp://z.about.com/d/musiced/1/0/-/8/viola.jpg
What is it made of?

it made with strings
How is it played?

The viola is played with a bow in the right hand.

At least 2 interesting facts.

It is one of the main instruments in a string quartet, along with two violins and a cello.
The viola is found in chamber ensembles of string instruments only, and also in full symphony orchestras where strings, woodwinds, brass, and percussion instruments play together.



Describe its sound.


A string quartet is a piece of music for four string instruments. A string quartet can also mean the four people who play a piece for four string instruments. The four instruments in a string quartet are almost always 2 violins, 1 viola and 1 cello. The reason that a double bass is not used is that it would sound too loud and heavy. The balance between 2 violins, viola and cello is perfect. String quartets are the most popular form of chamber music. Many composers have written string quartets. and l it sound good




Web address where it can be heard.
http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=5


Cello

The cello is used as a solo instrument, in chamber music, and as a member of the string section of an orchestra.


Pic ture: Include the web link where you found the picture.
Cello image
Cello image

http://www.musicwithease.com/cello-6.jpg
What is it made of?It is the second largest bowed string instrument in the modern symphony orchestra, the double bass being the largest

How is it played?
its played like a viola and violin with a bow

At least 2 interesting facts.
Cello was made in the mid 1500s . The first known maker is Andrea Amati
Describe its sound.
it sound like a viola

Web address where it can be heard.

http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=6


Bass

Bass (pronounced like the word "base") refers to a variety of musical instruments that can be collectively regarded as bass instruments since they produce tones that are in the low-pitched range. They belong to different families of instruments and can cover a wide range of musical roles. Since producing low pitches usually requires a long air column or string, the string and wind bass instruments are usually the largest instruments in their families or instrument classes.

Picture:


What is it maexternal image HUDSON_DOUBLE_BASS_SOLID_TOP.jpghttp://www.cranesmusicstore.com/images/HUDSON_DOUBLE_BASS_SOLID_TOP.jpg
WOOD
bass is alloy of copper and brass, so its made of brass and copper


How is it played?


At least 2 interesting facts.
ITS MADE OF WOOD
IT HAS COLOR
Describe its sound.
Music is an art form whose medium is sound. Common elements of music are pitch (which governs melody and harmony), rhythm (and its associated concepts tempo, meter, and articulation), dynamics, and the sonic qualities of timbre and texture. The word derives from Greek μουσική (mousike), "(art) of the Muses".[[#cite_note-0|[1]]]

Web address where it can be heard
http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=7

Woodwind Family


Flute
The flute is a musical instrument of the woodwind group. Unlike woodwind instruments with reeds

Picture:
external image flute3.jpghttp://www.utc.edu/Academic/Music/images/2008-09_Events_php/flute2.jpg
What is it made of?

flute is made of brass and mixed with copper
How is it played?

A LOUD NICE SOUD
At least 2 interesting facts.
The oldest flute ever discovered, though this is disputed.The five-holed flute has a V-shaped mouthpiece and is made from a vulture wing bone
Describe its sound.
NICE

Web address where it can be heard

http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=21

Oboe

An oboe is a woodwind instrument with a double reed. It looks very similar to the clarinet but it sounds very different. The sound is produced by blowing air through the double reed at the upper end of the instrument which forces the two reeds to vibrate together which produces the sound. A person that plays the oboe is called an oboist. A typical orchestra may have 2 oboes but sometimes 3. Sometimes there is also a cor anglais which sounds a fifth lower than the oboe. Very occasionally there is also a bass oboe, which sounds an octave below the oboe. Gustav Holst used one in his Suite "The Planets".

Picture:
external image oboe.gifhttp://datadragon.com/education/instruments/graphics/oboe.gif

What is it made of?
wood
How is it played?


An oboe is a woodwind instrument with a double reed. It looks very similar to the clarinet but it sounds very different. The sound is produced by blowing air through the double reed at the upper end of the instrument which forces the two reeds to vibrate together which produces the sound. A person that plays the oboe is called an oboist. A typical orchestra may have 2 oboes but sometimes 3. Sometimes there is also a cor anglais which sounds a fifth lower than the oboe. Very occasionally there is also a bass oboe, which sounds an octave below the oboe. Gustav Holst used one in his Suite "The Planets".

At least 2 interesting facts. it has color
made of wood
Describe its sound.
soft
Web address where it can be heard
http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=22

Clarinet

The clarinet is a musical instrument in the woodwind family

Picture:

external image Clarinet%281%29.jpg http://www.intersalesteaching.co.uk/images//Clarinet(1).jpg
What is it made of?
flute made of brass and mixed with cooper
How is it played? holes
you hold it with your hands and put fingers on holes then you blow in the tube to make
At least 2 interesting facts.
Describe its sound. IT REAL PREETY AND LOUD
Web address where it can be heard

http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=24


Bassoon

The bassoon is a woodwind instrument in the double reed family that typically plays music written in the bass and tenor registers, and occasionally higher. Appearing in its modern form in the 1800s, the bassoon figures prominently in orchestral, concert band, and chamber music literature. The bassoon is a non-[[wikicharacter, and agility. Listeners often compare its warm, dark, reedy timbre to that of a
picture:
external image bassoon-3.jpghttp://www.paddockorchestra.org/uploads/images/bassoon-3.jpg




What is it made of?

The modern bassoon is generally made of maple, with medium-hardness types such as sycamore maple and sugar maple preferred. Less-expensive models are also made of materials such as polypropylene and ebonite, primarily for student and outdoor use; metal bassoons were made in the past but have not been produced by any major manufacturer since 1889. The bore of the bassoon is conical, like that of the oboe and the saxophone, and the two parallel bores of the boot joint are connected at the bottom of the instrument with a U-shaped metal connector. Both bore and tone holes are precision-machined, and each instrument is finished by hand for proper tuning. The walls of the bassoon are thicker at various points along the bore; here, the tone holes are drilled at an angle to the axis of the bore, which reduces the distance between the holes on the exterior. This ensures coverage by the fingers of the average adult hand. Wooden instruments are lined with hard rubber along the interior of the wing and boot joints to prevent damage from moisture; wooden instruments are also stained and varnished. The end of the bell is usually fitted with a ring, either of metal, plastic or ivory. The joints between sections consist of a tenon fitting into a socket; the tenons are wrapped in either cork or string as a seal against air leaks. The bocal connects the reed to the rest of the instrument and is inserted into a socket at the top of the wing joint. Bocals come in many different lengths, depending on the desired tuning and playing characteristics.


How is it played?
The range of the bassoon begins at B-flat1 (the first one below the bass staff) and extends upward over three octaves (roughly to the E on the treble staff). Higher notes are possible but difficult to produce and rarely called for; orchestral parts rarely go higher than the C or D, with even Stravinsky's famously difficult opening solo in The Rite of Spring only ascending to the D. Low A at the bottom of the range is possible with a special extension to the instrument—see "Extended Techniques" below.

At least 2 interesting facts.
The range of the bassoon begins at B-flat1 (the first one below the bass staff) and extends upward over three octaves (roughly to the E on the treble staff). Higher notes are possible but difficult to produce and rarely called for; orchestral parts rarely go higher than the C or D, with even Stravinsky's famously difficult opening solo in The Rite of Spring only ascending to the D. Low A at the bottom of the range is possible with a special extension to the instrument—see "Extended Techniques" below.


Describe its sound.
soft loud kute
Web address where it can be heard
http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=26

Saxophone

The saxophone (also referred to simply as sax) is a conical-bored transposing musical instrument considered a member of the woodwind family. Saxophones are usually made of brass and are played with a single-reed mouthpiece similar to that of the clarinet. The saxophone was invented by Adolphe Sax in 1841. He wanted to create an instrument that would both be the loudest of the woodwinds and the most versatile of the brass, and would fill the then vacant middle ground between the two sections.

Picture:
external image Circa%201925%20Conn%20Saxaphone.jpghttp://www.marycatherinesantiques.com/images/Circa%201925%20Conn%20Saxaphone.jpg



How is it played
Most saxophones, both past and present, are made from brass and mouth piece which you blow in too make a sound

What is it made of?
The saxophone uses a single-reed mouthpiece similar to that of the clarinet. Most saxophonists use reeds made from Arundo donax cane, but since the 20th century some have also been made of fiberglass. Fiberglass reeds are more durable, but are generally considered to produce an inferior tone. The saxophone mouthpiece is larger than that of the clarinet,

At least 2 interesting facts
The saxophone was developed in the 1840s by Adolphe Sax, a Belgian-born instrument-maker, flautist and clarinetist working in Paris. While still working at his father's instrument shop in Brussels, Sax began developing an instrument which had the projection of a brass instrument with the agility of a woodwind. Another priority was to create an instrument which would overblow at the octave, unlike the clarinet, which rises in pitch by a twelfth when overblown; an instrument which overblew at the octave would have identical fingering for both registers..
Describe its sound.
IT SOUND SJUST LIKE A CLARNIET HAVE A BEAUTIFUL BLOW

Web address where it can be heard

http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=28


Brass Family


Trumpet


Picture:
external image trumpet.213142144.jpghttp://www.vijaiacademy.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/trumpet.213142144.jpg

What is it made of?


The trumpet is a musical instrument with the highest register in the orchestral brass family.[[#cite_note-0|[1]]] Trumpets are among the oldest musical instruments,[[#cite_note-1|[2]]] dating back to at least 1500 BC. They are constructed of brass tubing bent twice into an oblong shape, and are played by blowing air through closed lips, producing a "buzzing" sound which starts a standing wave vibration in the air column inside the trumpet.

How is it played?
On any trumpet, cornet, or flugelhorn, pressing the valves indicated by the numbers below will produce the written notes shown - "OPEN" means all valves up, "1" means first valve, "1-2" means first and second valve simultaneously and so on. The concert pitch which sounds depends on the transposition of the instrument. Engaging the fourth valve, if present, drops any of these pitches by a perfect fourth as well. Within each overtone series, the different pitches are attained by changing the embouchure, or lip position and "firmness". Standard fingerings above high C are the same as for the notes an octave below (C is 1-2, D is 1, etc.)

At least 2 interesting facts.
There are several types of trumpet; the most common is a transposing instrument pitched in B. The predecessors to trumpets did not have valves; however, modern trumpets have either three piston valves or three rotary valves, each of which increases the length of tubing when engaged, thereby lowering the pitch.

Describe its sound.
As with all brass instruments, sound is produced by blowing air through closed lips, producing a "buzzing" sound into the mouthpiece and starting a standing wave vibration in the air column inside the trumpet. The player can select the pitch from a range of overtones or harmonics by changing the lip aperture and tension (known as the embouchure). Modern trumpets also have three piston valves, each of which increases the length of tubing when engaged, thereby lowering the pitch. The first valve lowers the instrument's pitch by a whole step (2 semitones), the second valve by a half step (1 semitone), and the third valve by one-and-a-half steps (3 semitones). When a fourth valve is present, as with some piccolo trumpets, it lowers the pitch a perfect fourth (5 semitones). Used singly and in combination these valves make the instrument fully chromatic, i.e., able to play all twelve pitches of Western music. The sound is projected outward via the bell.

Web address where it can be heard.
http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=29

French Horn

The horn is the second highest sounding instrument group in the brass family. Horns are mostly tuned in B or F, or a combination of those. In some traditions, novice players use a single horn in F, while others prefer the B horn. Compared to the other brass instruments in the orchestra, it has a very different mouthpiece, but has the widest usable range - approximately four octaves, depending on the ability of the player. To produce different notes on the horn, one must do many things - the four most important are pressing the valves, holding the appropriate amount of lip tension, blowing air into the instrument, and placing the hand in the bell. More lip tension and faster air produces higher notes. Less lip tension and slower air produces lower notes. The right hand, usually cupped at a "three o-clock" position in the bell, can lower the pitch, depending on how far into the bell the player puts it, by as much as a semitone in the instrument's midrange. The horn plays in a higher portion of its overtone series compared to most brass instruments. Its conical bore (as opposed to the cylindrical bore of the trumpet or trombone) is largely responsible for its characteristic tone, often described as "mellow".

Picture
French Horn
French Horn


http://www.musicwithease.com/french-horn-pictures.html
What is it made of?
Horns have valves, operated with the left hand, to route the air into extra tubing to change the pitch. Most horns have lever-operated rotary valves, but some horns like the Vienna horn use piston valves (similar to trumpet valves). A horn without valves is known as a natural horn, changing pitch along the natural harmonics of the instrument (similar to a bugle), but with a wide range of notes due to the long tubing
How is it played?
YOU PLACE YOUR HAND BETWEEN THE METAL AND BLOW
At least 2 interesting facts.
Early horns were much simpler than modern horns, being comprised of brass tubes with a slightly flared opening (the bell) wound around a few times. These early "hunting" horns were originally played on a hunt, often while mounted, and the sound they produced was called a recheat. Change of pitch was effected entirely by the lips (the horn not being equipped with valves until the 19th century). Without valves, only the notes within the harmonic series are available. The horn was used, among other reasons, to call hounds on a hunt and created a sound most like a human voice, but carried much farther
Describe its sound.
IT SOFT AND LOUD
Web address where it can be heard.

http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=32

Trombone

The trombone is a musical instrument in the brass family. Like all brass instruments, sound is produced when the player’s vibrating lips (embouchure) cause the air column inside the instrument to vibrate. The trombone is usually characterised by a telescopic slide with which the player varies the length of the tube to change pitches, although the valve trombone uses three valves similar to those on a trumpet.
The word trombone derives from Italian tromba (trumpet) and -one (a suffix meaning "large"), so the name literally means "large trumpet". Trombones and trumpets share the important characteristic of having predominantly cylindrical bores. Therefore, the most frequently encountered trombones—the tenor and bass trombone—are the tenor and bass counterparts of the trumpet. They are both pitched in B—with the slide all the way in, the notes of the harmonic series based on B can be played—but trombones generally read music in concert pitch.

Picture:
external image Trombone.jpg
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_oAAqDWL3Jyo/See4u34dN1I/AAAAAAAAACM/V0y_F3cOyTo/s400/Trombone.jpg.

What is it made of?
brass instruments use a set of valves (typically three or four but as many as seven or more in some cases) operated by the player's fingers that introduce additional tubing, or crooks, into the instrument, changing its overall length. This family includes all of the modern brass instruments except the trombone: the trumpet, horn (also called the French horn), euphonium, and tuba, as well as the cornet, flügelhorn, tenor horn (alto horn), baritone horn, sousaphone, mellophone, and the old saxhorn. As valved instruments are predominant among the brasses today, a more thorough discussion of their workings can be found below. The valves are usually piston valves, but can be rotary valves. Rotary valves are the norm for the horn and are also prevalent on the tuba.

  • Slide brass instruments use a slide to change the length of tubing. The main instruments in this category are the trombone family, though valve trombones are occasionally used, especially in jazz. The trombone family's ancestor, the sackbut, and the folk instrument bazooka are also in the slide family.

How is it played?
The mouthpiece is a separate part of the trombone and can be interchanged with similarly-sized trombones from different manufacturers. Mouthpiece dimensions vary in length, diameter, rim shape, and cup depth. Each variation affects timbre (tone quality), and is a highly personal decision of advanced trombone players. Typically, a symphonic trombonist will choose a mouthpiece with a deeper cup and sharper inner rim shape in order to produce a rich, full-textured tone quality that is desired in most symphony orchestras. A jazz trombonist, on the other hand, may choose a shallower cup in order to achieve a thinner, less Teutonic tone quality. However, these decisions vary from player to player.

At least 2 interesting facts.
The instrument was used extensively across Europe from its appearance in the 15th century to a fading out in most places across the mid-late 17th century. It was used in outdoor events, in concert and in liturgical settings. The groups varied from alta capella, wind ensembles, with voices, and in the first 'orchestra'-type ensembles in religious settings such as St. Mark's Venice in the early 17th century. Famous composers writing for the trombone in this period include Giovanni Gabrieli and his uncle Andrea Gabrieli, Claudio Monteverdi and Heinrich Schütz. There is also some solo pieces written specifically for trombone in the early 17th century.
Describe its sound.
IT SOUNDS LIKE THE FRENCH HORN
Web address where it can be heard.http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=30


Tuba


The tuba is the largest and lowest pitched brass instrument. Sound is produced by vibrating or "buzzing" the lips into a large cupped mouthpiece. It is one of the most recent additions to the modern symphony orchestra, first appearing in the mid-19th century, when it largely replaced the ophicleide. Tuba is Latin for trumpet or horn. The horn referred to would most likely resemble what is known as a Baroque trumpet.

Picture:

external image tuba.jpg
http://www.music.vt.edu/musicdictionary/textt/images/tuba.jpg

What is it made of
A tuba with its tubing wrapped for placing the instrument on the player's lap is usually called a concert tuba or simply a tuba. Tubas with the bell pointing forward (
pavillon tournant) instead of upward are often called recording tubas because of their popularity in the early days of recorded music, as their sound could more easily be directed at the recording instrument. When wrapped to surround the body for marching, it is traditionally known as a hélicon. The modern sousaphone, named after American bandmaster John Philip Sousa, is a hélicon with the bell pointed up and then curved to point forward. Some ancestors of the tuba, such as the military bombardon, were wrapped so that the bell extended far backwards over the player's shoulder. These instruments were commonly used in military bands during the American Civil War, and are known as "over-the-shoulder saxhorns".

How is it played?

At least 2 interesting facts.
Describe its sound.
Web address where it can be heard

http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=31



Percussion Family


Snare Drum

The snare drum is a drum with strands of snares made of curled metal wire, metal cable, plastic cable, or gut cords stretched across the drumhead, typically the bottom. Pipe and tabor and some military snare drums often have a second set of snares on the bottom (internal) side of the top (batter) head to make a "brighter" sound, and the Brazilian caixa commonly has snares on the top of the upper drumhead. The snare drum is considered one of the most important drums of the drum kit.

Picture:
external image ASnare.jpg


http://www.brdistribution.co.uk/acatalog/ASnare.jpg
What is it made of?
its made with curled metal wire or metal cable
How is it played?
you play it with sticks and you tap the top of the drum
At least 2 interesting facts.

The snare drum seems to have descended from a medieval drum called the Tabor, which was a drum with a single gut snare strung across the bottom. It is a bit bigger than a medium tom and was first used in war, often played with a fife or pipe; the player would play both the fife and drum (see also Pipe and Tabor).
Describe its sound.
high pitch
Web address where it can be heard
http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=4



Bass Drum

A bass drum is a relatively large drum that produces a note of low definite or indefinite pitch. The bass drums are of variable sizes and are used in several musical genres (see [[#usage|usage]] below). Three major types of bass drums can be distinguished: the large orchestral bass drum, the smaller 'kick' drum, and the pitched bass drums. The type usually seen or heard in orchestral, ensemble or concert band music is the orchestral, or concert bass drum (in italian: gran cassa, gran tamburo). It is the largest drum of the orchestra. The 'kick' drum, struck with a beater attached to a pedal, is usually seen on drum kits. The third type, the pitched bass drum, is generally used in marching bands and drum corps. This particular type of drum is tuned to a specific pitch and is usually played in a set of three to five drums. The bass drum was imported from the Middle East. It is a direct descendant of the davul.[[#cite_note-Vienna_Symphonic_Library-1|[2]]]

Picture:
external image 125_bass%20drum_premier.jpg
http://www.edinburghbagpipes.co.uk/images/125_bass%20drum_premier.jpg.


What is it made of?
IT IS PLAYED MLIKE A SNARE DRUM BUT INSTEAD YOU HIT THE SIDES
How is it played?
WITH STICKS
At least 2 interesting facts.'


In most orchestral uses the bass drum is traditionally quite large, about 36" in diameter. It is usually played with one or sometimes two large, padded mallets. Usually the right hand plays the drum and the left hand muffles it. When played with two mallets, a knee or forearm can be used for damping.

Describe its sound.
a high pitch

WHERE ADRESS CAN BE HEARD
http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=10

Timpani

Timpani (also known commonly as kettledrums or kettle drums) are musical instruments in the percussion family. A type of drum, they consist of a skin called a head stretched over a large bowl traditionally made of copper, and more recently, constructed of more lightweight fiberglass. They are played by striking the head with a specialized drum stick or timpani mallet. Unlike most drums, they are capable of producing an actual pitch when struck, and can be tuned, often with the use of a pedal mechanism to control each drum's range of notes. Timpani evolved from military drums to become a staple of the classical orchestra by the last third of the 18th century. Today, they are used in many types of musical ensembles including concert, marching percussion, and even some rock bands.
external image moz-screenshot-6.png
Picture: external image timpani.jpghttp://library.thinkquest.org/04oct/01419/Intrument%20Folder/timpani.jpg


What is it made of?


Timpani come in a variety of sizes from about 84 centimeters (33 inches) in diameter down to piccolo timpani of 30 centimeters (12 inches) or less.[[#cite_note-grove-2|[3]]] A 33-inch drum can produce the C below the bass clef, and specialty piccolo timpani can play up into the treble clef. In Darius Milhaud's 1923 ballet score La création du monde//, the timpanist must play the F sharp at the bottom of the treble clef.

How is it played?
At least 2 interesting facts.
Describe its sound.
Web address where it can be heard.
http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=15


Cymbals

Cymbals consist of thin, normally round plates of various alloys; see cymbal making for a discussion of their manufacture. The greater majority of cymbals are of indefinite pitch, although small disc-shaped cymbals based on ancient designs sound a definite note (see: crotales). Cymbals are used in many ensembles ranging from the orchestra, percussion ensembles, jazz bands, heavy metal bands, and marching groups. Drum kits usually incorporate at least one suspended cymbal and a pair of hi-hat cymbals.

Picture:external image drums_sabian_cymbals.jpg
http://www.hothousemusicgroup.com/images/drums_sabian_cymbals.jp

This link is incorrect.

What is it made of?
GOLD METAL
How is it played?
YOU JUST BANG THE TO CYMBALS TOGHTETR
At least 2 interesting facts.

Cymbals are measured by their diameter often in inches or centimeters. The size of the cymbal affects its sound, larger cymbals usually being louder and having longer sustain. The weight describes how thick the cymbal is. Cymbal weights are important to the sound they produce and how they play. Heavier cymbals have a louder volume, more cut, and better stick articulation (when using drum sticks). Thin cymbals have a fuller sound and faster response.


Describe its sound.
LOUG BANGIIN
Web address where it can be heard
http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=9